#1051 15th Jan 2018 05:19:11

Crusader1307
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Re: History Thread

SPOTLIGHT ON MEDIEVAL SWORDSMANSHIP
THE OX GUARD
Also called “Ochs”, this position is used as both Attack and Lunge. It is not commonly used as a Guard. The Swordsman positions his Legs with the Right Forward and Left Rear or Canted slightly rearward. The positioning of The Blade is as such as it is held  high and angled outwards as straight as possible. The extreme height of the Blade is countered by one’s ability to control the blade’s steadiness through Hand Grip and Arm placement.
 
To accomplish this and maintain control, The Swordsman maintains a strong Grip on the Front Handle, angling his Right arm at a slight but perceivable 45-degree angle. The Left Arm and Hand control The Pommel, with the Arm extending rearward at a slight 20-degree angle.
 
In appearance “uncomfortable”, The Swordsman can best control his Blade and maintain his forward vision of his Target. The Blade position is flattened, but can be adjusted in such a way as to cleave downwards. The Ox Guard is administered from both The Left and Right position (or repositioning of The Swordsman’s Arms.

                                                                       Medierval_Swordsmanship_-_Left_Ox_Ochs.jpg

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#1052 15th Jan 2018 07:25:09

Crusader1307
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Re: History Thread

SPOTLIGHT ON MEDIEVAL SWORDMANSHIP
THE LEFT & RIGHT GUARD
The Left or Right Guard Position (also known as “The Plow” of “Pflug”), is a basic position used by Swordsmen to advance on an Enemy from The Front. From this stance, one can also move into many other Guards, Blocks and Attacks. The Blade is held at the waist, pointing outwards. The “True” or edge is positioned downward. It is held at a 45-degree angle (Front).
 
The Hand Grip requires The Right Hand to grasp the Handle at the top firmly (for both control and aim). The Left Hand is positioned semi-inverted, with the palm controlling The Pommel.
 
In application, a Swordsman can push forward in a “Power Thrust”. The point of aim is the Center Mass of an Enemy. The inverted Hold of The Left Hand allows for a turning of the blade. As such, The Blade edge will become inverted or face upwards.
 
The Swordsman Legs are spread shoulder length apart with the Left Leg slightly forward for stability. Conversely, The Left or Right Guard can also be used to deflect a swipe or charge from an Enemy.

                                 Swordsmanship_-_The_Left_Plow_Guard_Pflug.jpg             Swordsmanship_-_The_Right_Plow_Guard_Pflug.jpg

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#1053 30th Mar 2018 20:37:38

Crusader1307
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Re: History Thread

SPOTLIGHT ON MEDIEVAL CULTURE & CUSTOMS
MEDIEVAL SWORDSMANSHIP
THE “HORN OF WRATH”
Also referred to in The German School of Sword (16th Century), as The “Zornhut’’, this was an intimidating and very powerful striking technique. It was designed to inflict maximum damage to an Enemies Armor or to be used as a “Kill Shot’’.
 
In application, The Zornhut was similar to many other Attack Stances taught by The German School of Sword. It differed from the sheer force used to execute the movement. The Stance, which bears a very similar style to a Modern American Baseball Strike Stance, or some English Cricket positions, involved the legs of The Swordsman to be equally spread with the shoulders. A slight 45-degree angle used to provide the Right Leg as the “stronger”.
 
Raising The Blade up and over The Head (Rear), The Hand Gripping was firmly placed into the Center of The Handle. The Swordsman next turned his Upper Torso at an angle to compensate and duplicate his Right Leg Placement.
 
Putting all force and energy into the next movement, The Swordsman would swing The Blade from behind The Head, leveling it towards an Enemies own Head. The result was severe blunt force trauma (if a Helmet was worn) – to instant decapitation (if one was not).

                                                               Medieval_Culture_Customs_-_Medieval_Swordsmanship_-_Zornhut.jpg

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#1054 8th Jun 2018 08:14:18

Crusader1307
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Re: History Thread

SPOTLIGHT ON MEDIEVAL CULTURE AND CUSTOMS
MEDIEVAL SWORDSMANSHIP
“FINESTRA”
The defensive position known as The Finestra, was a common tactic in Germany, Italy and France around the 15th Century – and until the “end” of the use of the “Big Bladed” weapons. In application, the Swordsman positions his legs shoulder length apart with knees bent slightly.
 
The Right Arm(strong arm) was raised slight over and above the Right eyebrow, with the blade normally pointing outward towards an Enemy. The Left arm was brought over the Chest, with the Left Hand held in a stability position to steady the Blade.
 
This Position was designed for quick thrusts to the head, neck and upper chest of an Enemy, with the option of being used as a downward thrust and slash – if needed.

                                                      PxNQb3Q.jpg

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#1055 18th Jul 2018 06:50:46

Crusader1307
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Re: History Thread

SPOTLIGHT ON MEDIEVAL CULTURE AND CUSTOMS
MEDIEVAL SWORDSMANSHIP
‘’TAG’’
The Position of Tag was a basic staple of German Swordsmanship. The Stance was a ‘’Ready’’ Position from which multiple attack or defensive strikes could be applied.
 
In application, The Tag involved the leg placement with the “strong” leg rearward, with both legs spread roughly 180-degrees. The Sword was raised and placed with the strong arm waist high and canted, with the Blade close to the side of the body (resting against the Right Shoulder).
 
The weaker arm and hand were brought around the front and clasped the handle (for stabilization). In view, The Tag closely resembled a modification of a Baseball Bat stance (or ‘’Ready’’).

                                                                   YpRlpN8.jpg

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#1056 29th Jul 2018 09:31:06

Crusader1307
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Re: History Thread

SPOTLIGHT ON MEDIEVAL CULTURE AND CUSTOMS
MEDIEVAL SWORDSMANSHIP
THE ‘’TUTTA’’
Another in The Medieval School of German Swordsmanship was defensive stance known as The Tutta. Often seen as a ‘’Low Ready’’ position, the use of such was also a “guard’’. In application, The Swordsman would position his strong leg rearward, with his weak or left leg somewhat hyper-extended. This allowed to give a stance for a lunge at his Opponent.
 
The positioning of one’s blade required for the strong hand to grip the blade outward, with the weak hand acting as a stabilizer. The face of the blade was positioned flat side out.
 
The position allowed a Swordsman to quickly bring his blade up to a variety of additional front or side strikes.

                                                                   e2Wip05.jpg

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#1057 21st Mar 2019 01:12:34

Crusader1307
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Re: History Thread

SPOTLIGHT ON MEDIEVAL CULTURE AND CUSTOMS
MEDIEVAL SWORDSMANSHIP
THE ''WECHSEL''
The German School of Swordmanship in the 16th Century was noted for developing many widely used combat tactics in the late Middle Ages. One such defensive tactic was The Wechsel Stance. This was a Low Guard tactic, in which a Blade could be used for low strikes – directed towards an Enemies lower legs.

The Swordsman angles his legs in a shoulder length stance, which can face either left or right (depending on the strike). The Sword Arm (strong), is placed high on the hilt (handle). This steadies and allows for direction of the strike.

The weaker arm is used to move the blade into the direction intended. The blade tip is positioned downward, as to touch the ground. The strike is brought up with the strong arm to hit either the shins or front of the thigh of an Enemy.

Much conjecture is given to The Wechsel Strike. It could be used to lift up dirt or sand as a means of ''blinding'' or impairing the vision of an attacker as well. Such tactics would be considered ''ungentlemanly'' in combat (but was no doubt used nonetheless).

                                         K0hFcz1.jpg

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#1058 20th May 2019 03:37:49

Crusader1307
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Re: History Thread

SPOTLIGHT ON FLAGS, BANNERS AND STANDARDS
THE FRENCH FLAGS OF AGINCOURT
The debacle of The French Army at The Battle of Agincourt (1415), was a crucial turning point for The England during The Hundred Year War. The French, whose numbers were between 5,000 and 8,000 strong, fell prey to (3) classic mistakes. As had been previously discussed, battlefield conditions (heavy mud), coupled with and an over zealousness with regards to taking Royal ''ransoms'' of English Lords – plus the deployment of The Longbow, all were responsible for the disaster. 109 major French Lords fell at Agincourt. The loss of semi and fully experienced Battle Lords, would play a major role in future French losses until the rise of Joan of Arc (1429).

The French Lords represented themselves in the Field by Banners. These were several types, from the 12 to 18-foot long Pennons to the smaller Vexiloids mounted on ''L''-Staffs. Each of these Flags were based in full or in part on The Lord's Family Crest or Heraldic symbolism.

Not every Lord bore his Personal Banner. Many Lessor Lords who aligned themselves with a more powerful Lord simply used that Lord's ''House Banner''. Of the 109 Lords who fell at Agincourt (including The Lord Marshal of France, Charles d'Albret), (11) known Banners were captured by The English.

                                                          qlwjizq.gif
                                                        

ljIE1LA.gif   Re5gGYf.gif  0zmaMJA.gif
      

lWZo91q.gif  kd3SAjG.gif  Mveqicg.gif
            

SWj7c0m.gif  4c08GUr.gif  gNtlIwf.gif

                                                              OBZElbI.gif 

1st Row:

Charles d'Albret (Constable Marshal of France)

2nd Row:

Antoine, Duke of Brabant, Ferry de Lorraine, Count of Vaudemont, Jean of Brittany

3rd Row:

Jacques, Count of Roucy, Louis de Bourbon, Philippe Count of Nevers

4th Row:

Waleran de Raineval, Count of Fauconbergues, Charles de Artois, Count of Eu, Charles, Count of Orleans

5th Row:

Jean, The Duke of Bourbon




                                                       

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#1059 3rd Oct 2019 13:12:46

Lord_Chris
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Re: History Thread

The admin team have decided to close the History thread with immediate effect and move all articles off over to the main StrongholdNation website. From now on, you can access all articles on https://www.strongholdnation.co.uk/history/glossary or through the site navigation menu.

Crusader1307 will still be occasionally posting articles here & we will be keeping you all up-to-date on all things history in the meantime, so please do not forget to check back here!


The fields have eyes, and the woods have ears.
— Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales: The Knight's Tale

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#1060 11th Oct 2019 04:00:33

Crusader1307
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Re: History Thread

Hello All......

Just an Update. Much ''blood and gore'' have been spilt in the transfer of Files (and Photos and et al)  big_smile. We have so far transferred roughly 650 Articles....Jump over and check out some of the Older Posts.

Trudging On........
Crusader 1307

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#1061 23rd Oct 2019 22:35:36

Crusader1307
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Re: History Thread

ANOTHER Update, Oh Faithful Readers...

We are fast approaching 2,000 Articles transferred to The Main Page. Well  ''on schedule''.........

Thanks for your patience!

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#1062 16th Nov 2019 10:58:50

Crusader1307
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Re: History Thread

Hello All,
Yet ANOTHER Update on the status of moving The History Thread to The Main Page......
We have hit 3,700 Articles transferred so far...there is finally ''light'' at the end of The Tunnel.
  
Soldiering On............  big_smile

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